Butterbur Found Effective In Treating Migraines: Studies

butterbur

The Daisy-family Petasites Prove Themselves Effective In Migraine Treatment (1)

Butterbur, Petasites or Sweet Coltsfoot are residents of moist regions like marshes, ditches  and riverbeds and do well in temperate regions in the northern hemisphere. Studies have shown that certain species contain chemicals petasin and isopetasin which occur in high concentrations in the plant’s root and are very effective in treating migraines. 

In my post of April 26th, 2012, titled ‘New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency’ I had outlined how the AAN listed out Butterbur as one of the herbal formulae that they found effective in the management of migraines. (2) 

The organic compound petasin found in butterbur is a combination of the ester of petasol and angelic acid known to stub inflammatory response in the body. It is also a proven muscle relaxant. Moreover, irritable blood vessels that are known to add to the woes of a migraineur are also soothed by petasin and isopetasin by control of blood pressure and spasmodic capillary action. Several German researches have found that incidences of migraines could be reduced by as much as 50% even in long-term patients. (3) 

Here are a list of studies that have expanded on the find: 

  • Evidence-based guideline update: NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society; AHRQ (US Dept Of Health & Human Services); http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?f=rss&id=36897
  •  The First Placebo-Controlled Trial of a Special Butterbur Root Extract for the Prevention of Migraine: Reanalysis of Efficacy Criteria; European Neurology; Diener HC, Rahlfs VW, Danesch U. Eur Neurol. 2004;51(2):89-97. http://www.petasites.eu/PDF/Eur_Neurol.pdf
  •  An extract of Petasites hybridus is effective in the prophylaxis of migraine. NCBI Resources – PubMed; Grossmann M, Schmidramsl H. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2000 Sep;38(9):430-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11020030
  •  Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventive treatment for migraine.NCBI Resources – PubMed; Lipton RB, Gobel H, Einhaupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A. Neurology. 2004 Dec 28;63(12):2240-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15623680

Butterbur is available as a herbal tea though it is hard to palate because of it’s bitter taste. However, capsules of butterbur may be a better option. Doctors usually recommend 50-75 mg twice daily as effective prophylactic dosage.

It is imperative that you consult a doctor before taking any butterbur preparation. 

Once advised, choose a brand that says ‘PA-Free’ indicative of the removal of toxic chemical pyrolizidine alkaloid which is toxic to the liver. (4)  

SOURCES: 

  1. Image Credit: Butterbur 628x 323; Spring Allergy Relief; Prevention.com; Web February 2014; http://bit.ly/1nMkgOH
  2. New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency; Migrainingjenny.wordpress.com; Web February 2014; https://migrainingjenny.wordpress.com/2012/04/26/new-guidelines-from-american-academy-of-neurology-on-reduction-of-migraine-frequency/
  3. Butterbur: For Migraines, Allergies, And More; Chiroeco.com; Web February 2014; http://www.chiroeco.com/chiropractic/news/14902/856/butterbur-%20for%20migraines-%20allergies-%20and%20more/
  4. Butterbur In The Treatment Of Migraines; WholesomeOne.com; Web February 2014; http://www.wholesomeone.com/article/butterbur-treatment-migraines

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Acupuncture: A ‘Yes’ or A ‘No’ For Migraineurs?

This post has been drawn from Medicine News Today for the benefit of migraineurs:

In order to find out the effect of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture in treating migraines, a team of investigators carried out a randomized controlled human trial. 480 individuals at 9 hospitals in China who experienced migraines for over one year, with two or three migraines in the 3 months prior to the investigation, were enrolled to participate in the study.


The researchers randomly assigned the volunteers to four groups. Those in one group received sham acupuncture, while participants in the other three groups received different types of acupuncture. Their ages ranged from 18 to 65 years.

In the United States and England, migraines affect approximately 16% to 18% of women and 6% to 8% of men. Evidence on how effective acupuncture is at treating migraines is mixed, as some studies suggest it is the placebo effect, instead of a therapeutic effect that relieves symptoms. Acupuncture distinguishes between real acupuncture points and non-acupuncture (sham) points.

Dr. Fan-rong Liang, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China, explains: “We found that the outcomes following acupuncture were significantly better than with sham acupuncture during weeks 13-16, but the effect was clinically minor.”
After 16 weeks, approximately half to three-quarters of participants were better after sham acupuncture and proper acupuncture. The researchers said: “Acupuncture has a large effect on treating migraines, but the specific therapeutic effect may be minor.”
In an associated commentary, Dr. Albrecht Molsberger, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany and the University of North Carolina, explains that according to previous evidence, acupuncture helps treat severe migraine attacks.

Molsberger explains: “On the basis of the existing evidence, acupuncture should be an option for the first-line treatment of migraine to supplement other non-pharmacologic treatment options.”
In a second randomized controlled trial, investigators in the Netherlands enrolled 490 patients from 64 general practices, 233 of them attended consultations to assess treatment of their migraines, as well as 257 in the control group. The researchers set out to examine whether a proactive approach by primary care physicians to patients with suboptimal migraine treatment would result in improvements.

In the Netherlands, only 8% to 12% of all patients with migraines used prophylaxis, while a considerable amount of individuals used too much medication for migraine attacks.

Even though more individuals took prescription medication to prevent migraines as a result of the approach, the researchers observed no clinically relevant effect after six months.

Dr. Antonia Smelt, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands, with co-authors, explained: “We found no clinically relevant effect of a proactive approach to migraine in primary care for patients who were using two or more doses of triptan per month.”

The researchers conclude:
“It is possible that the intervention resulted in better treatment for patients not using prophylactic medication at baseline who had two or more attacks of migraine per month. Future interventions in primary care should target these patients.”

 

SOURCE:

Migraine – The Enigma Of Trial Results; Grace Rattue; Medical News Today; January 2012; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/240139.php

What the Migraineurs Should Know About The Triptan Drugs

(Source: http://tinyurl.com/l332mz )

Triptans are the relatively new weaponry in the scientists’ arsenal in migraine management and treatment. They work at the neurochemical (serotonin receptor) level. Triptans are not painkillers. All the Triptan drugs act at the wall of the blood vessels (especially cranial/dural blood vessels) and cause their constriction (or narrowing) called vasoconstriction, thus offsetting the swelling that causes the pain. It is also effective in alleviating some of the other symptoms of migraine attack such as sensitivity to light and sound. It acts towards stimulating the release of serotonin in the bloodstream.

Triptan range of medication includes chemicals Frovatriptan, Naratriptan, Eletriptan, Sumatriptan, Almotriptan and Rizatriptan. They should however, never be mixed with ergotamine drugs or any other drug stated in the drug literature or by the doctor. In addition, they are not to be taken in conjunction with any anti-depressant that is known to increase serotonin levels. Neither are they indicated for use by hemiplegic and basilar artery migraineurs.

All of these medications have similar possible side effects such as those of dizziness, fatigue, tingling sensations on skin, dryness of mouth, hot flashes, chest pain or tightness, sensitivity to temperatures, joint pains, coronary artery vasospasm, transient myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation, serotonin syndrome etc.

Triptan drugs are available at pharmacies on showing a doctor’s prescription due to the potential side effects, which may be serious in nature. Some Triptan drugs work faster than the others do. Some others work for longer hours, some have only one set of side effects, and the other Triptans may have another set. This makes it imperative for you to consult your doctor before taking these medications. The doctor will make a decision on a case-to-case basis depending on your migraine frequency, intensity, duration, medical history (especially those of heart, diabetes and hypertension etc).

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