Migraines Peg Risk Of Facial Palsy Significantly

ID-100247674

Migraineurs at Double The Risk Of Developing Facial Paralysis (1)

As per a recent study conducted by a team of scientists working with Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan and National Yang-Ming University, migraineurs are at almost double the risk than non-migraineurs to develop facial paralysis also known as Bell’s Palsy.

The report of the study was published in the 13th January, 2015 issue of the medical journal Neurology of the American Association of Neurologists. Bell’s Palsy occurs due to the dysfunction of a specific cranial nerve that controls facial muscle movements. Some characteristics involve not being able to blink with the eye on the side the facial nerve is affected. Other signs include development of a facial droop on the affected side. Other things such as smiling, frowning, tear-formation, salivation, flaring nostrils and raising eyebrows may all be affected in Bell’s Palsy.

As per lead researcher and author of the study, Shuu-Jiun Wang, MD, “This is a very new association between migraine and Bell’s palsy. Our study also suggests that these two conditions may share a common underlying link.” (2)

It is assumed that anything between 11 to 40 people in every 100,000 people get Bell’s Palsy due to recurring migraines. In the study two groups of adult population were selected. The total persons under study were 136,704. One group had the migraineurs and the other had the non-migraineurs. The observations of the study continued for a period of 3 years. During that time, 671 people in the migraine group and 365 of the non-migraine group were newly diagnosed with Bell’s palsy. People with migraine were twice as likely to develop Bell’s palsy even after researchers accounted for other factors and medical conditions. (3)

According to Dr. Wang, “Infection, inflammation or heart and vascular problems could be shared causes for these diseases. If a common link is identified and confirmed, more research may lead to better treatments for both conditions.”

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Woman Face With Natural Look by Phasinphoto; freedigitalphotos.net; Web January 2015; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/woman-face-with-natural-look-photo-p247674
  2. Migraine May Double Risk Of Facial Paralysis; ScienceDaily.com; Web December 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141217171315.htm
  3. Does Migraine Produce Facial Palsy? Neurology; Web January 2015; http://www.neurology.org/content/84/2/108.short

 Copyrights apply to this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.

Advertisements

Middle Age Migraineurs At Risk Of Parkinson’s Later

ID-10081435

Studies Show Some Middle-Age Migraineurs Go On To Develop Parkinson’s At Old Age (1)

A recent study conducted at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, and published in the medical journal Neurology (of the American Academy of Neurology) , showed that there was a link between migraines and the development of Parkinson’s Disease.

Though severe migraine attacks are considered as disabling as serious illnesses such as dementia, active psychosis or even quadriplegia, it is still the most under-funded and less researched of all neurological diseases in the world.

As per lead author of the study, Ann I. Scher, M.D migraines are the most common brain disorder among both the sexes linked to both cerebrovascular and heart disease. However, the study exhibited that the link between middle-age migraining and Parkinson’s is stronger for women who suffer migraines with aura. She says, “This new possible association is one more reason research is needed to understand, prevent and treat the condition.” (2)

The research involved 5620 persons from Iceland for a period of 25 years. Their ages were between 33 and 65 years at the time when the study began. Of the 5620 persons studied, 1028 had headaches without migraine symptoms, 238 had migraines without aura and 430 experienced migraines with aura. Here are the result highlights:  (3)

  • Migraineurs with aura twice as likely to develop Parkinson’s later than Migraineurs without aura
  • 1% of the persons without headaches developed Parkinson’s later when compared to 2.4% who developed it and had migraines with aura.
  • People with migraine with aura were also around 3.6 times more likely to report at least four of the six symptoms of Parkinson’s, and people with migraine without aura were 2.3 times more likely.
  • Overall rates in absolute terms were as:
        • In people with migraine with aura: 19.7%
        • In people with migraine without aura: 12.6%
        • In people with no headaches at all: 7.5%.

According to Scher, “A dysfunction in the brain messenger dopamine is common to both Parkinson’s and Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS), and has been hypothesized as a possible cause of migraine for many years. Symptoms of migraine such as excessive yawning, nausea and vomiting are thought to be related to dopamine receptor stimulation.  More research should focus on exploring this possible link through genetic studies”

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Frustrated Caucasian Woman by Stock Images; Freedigitalphotos.net; Web October 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Emotions_g96-Frustrated_Caucasian_Woman_p81435.html
  2. Link Found Between Migraine And Parkinson’s; Medical News Today; Web October 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282678.php
  3. Migraines In Middle Age, Parkinson’s Risk Later? WebMD.com; Web October 2014; http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/news/20140917/are-migraines-in-middle-age-tied-to-raised-parkinsons-risk-later

Copyrights apply on this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.

Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Offers Significant Relief To Some Migraineurs: Study

Migraine Blog Eyelid

Eyelid Nerve Decompression Surgery Benefits Some Migraineurs (1)

What some migraineurs are willing to risk to shut off that pain. Turns out that getting under a knife that works on your eyelid is a risk well worth taking for them. This is not a procedure recommended for every migraineur. To be eligible for this eyelid cosmetic surgery, you need to meet certain criteria and thus screened to check if you should do this. The surgery essentially decompresses the nerves in the eyelid that trigger migraine episodes in many.

Dr. Oren Tessler, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine, have seen that more than 90% of the patients who underwent this surgery experienced relief and also got a bonus cosmetic eyelid surgery. The study and it’s findings have been published in the medical journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

The study examined 35 patients all of whom suffered from chronic nerve decompression triggering migrainous episodes. All of them had used some sort of nerve blocking treatment earlier or Botox at some point of time trying to tackle the pain.

As per Dr. Oren, “Surgery is a valid treatment for migraines in certain patients. We believe that these patients should have ready access to migraine trigger site decompression surgery. Although larger studies are needed, we have shown that we can restore these patients to full and productive lives.” (2)

The eyelid nerve decompression surgery is an alternative to the much done endoscopic approach where sensors are passed under scalp skin. However, this latter method makes it unsuitable for many depending on their anatomy. Also endoscopes are not available with every team and neither is it safe to assume endoscopy expertise in ever surgeon. However, in the eyelid cosmetic surgery for the screened and selected patients simply involved making a minor slit in their upper eyelid resulting in release of the decompressed nerve and subsequent deactivation of the nerve involved in the migraine episodes. (3)

The team involved in the study also included surgeons from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Some statistics on the surgery:

  • An overall positive response of 90.7%
  • Complete elimination of migraines in 51% of the patients.
  • 33% of the patients had between 50 and 80% of their symptoms resolved.

SOURCES

  1.  Caucasian Girl’s Blue Eye; Image Credit – Serge Bertasius Photography; Free Digital Photos; Web August 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Younger_Women_g57-Caucasian_Girls_Blue_Eye_p154783.html
  2. Surgeons report significant migraine relief from cosmetic eyelid surgery technique; Eureka Alert; Web August 2014; http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-07/lsuh-srs073114.php
  3. Cosmetic eyelid surgery technique can help cure migraine: Study; Business Standard; Web August 2014; http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ani/cosmetic-eyelid-surgery-technique-can-help-cure-migraine-study-114080101045_1.html

Copyrights apply to this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.

Danger Of Ischemic Stroke In Older Migraineurs

stroke_isc_web Older Migraineurs Have Higher Chances Of Suffering Silent Brain Injuries – (1)

A new study published in the May 15th issue of American Heart and Stroke Association’s medical journal Stroke, suggests that older migraineurs have an double the risk of suffering from silent brain injuries and ischemic stroke than those who do not experience migraines.

Silent strokes can be asymptomatic i.e they do not show symptoms but increase the risk of future strokes. Silent stroke or a silent brain infarction is caused by a blood clot getting into the brain artery and thus interrupting the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to brain tissue surrounding the clot thus killing it.

As per Teshamae Monteith, M.D., lead author of the study, “I do not believe migraine sufferers should worry, as the risk of ischemic stroke in people with migraine is considered small. However, those with migraine and vascular risk factors may want to pay even greater attention to lifestyle changes that can reduce stroke risk, such as exercising and eating a low-fat diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables.” (2)

He raised caution that if an older migraineurs had other coexisting conditions like a high blood pressure (hypertension) or a sedentary lifestyle, it would add to the risk factor for suffering silent strokes and brain damage. He thus advised them to take medication to address hypertension and to bring it under control.

The study was a research on diverse ethnic groups including people of Hispanic and African origin. It was a collaborative investigation conducted by University of Miami and Columbia University.

Some of the highlights of the study were as follows: (3)

  • Approximate 40% of the population studied comprised of men.
  • The average age of the population was around 71 years old.
  • 65% of the population under study was of Hispanic origin.
  • Of the 546 studied, 104 had a history of migraines.

Some conclusions arrived at were as:

  • Risk of silent brain infarctions in those with migraine double even after adjusting other stroke risk factors.
  • Migraines with aura were not a deciding factor in measuring risk of silent strokes.
  • No real increase in the volume of white matter/ Small blood vessel anamolies was associated with migraines.
  • Some lesions came across in radiographic images as having ischemic origins but more research was required to confirm this.

According to Monteith, “We still don’t know if treatment for migraines will have an impact on stroke risk reduction, but it may be a good idea to seek treatment from a migraine specialist if your headaches are out of control. (4)

Previous studies indicated migraine could be an important stroke risk factor for younger people.

SOURCES:

  1. Image Credit: Ischemic stroke; Heart & Stroke Foundation – Canada; Web May 2014; http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/c.ikIQLcMWJtE/b.3484151/k.7916/Stroke__Ischemic_stroke.htm
  2. Older migraine sufferers may have more silent brain injury; Science Daily News; Web May 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515163826.htm
  3. Abstract of the study can be accessed at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.abstract
  4. Older people with migraines ‘more likely to have silent brain injury’; Medical News Today; Web May 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276842.php

Details of the study published in AHA journal, Stroke: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.full.pdf+html

Copyrights apply to this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.

 

FDA Approves Hi Tech Headband That Prevents Migraines

CEFALY

The Cefaly Headband That Prevents Migraines (1)

Engineers and pharmacists at STX-Med from Belgium have come up with a sophisticated electronic device that excites precisely the sensitive nerve cells to treat pain and motor neurons to obtain muscle contraction or treat muscle spasms. Known as the Cefaly, it has now been approved for sale in the US by the FDA. The device is already in usage among migraineurs in France, Canada, Australia and elsewhere. This external headband that offers neuro-stimulation is worn in particular to treat both migraines and tension headaches. (2)

The Cefaly is a battery-powered headband that emits electric currents to stimulate the nerves that are involved in migraine episodes. Tests on 67 patients have shown that this device reduces not only the total number of migraine attacks per month but also decreases the intensity of an attack.

The device is based on TENS (or Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) technology that has been studied in the medical circles for over four decades. The usage of TENS techniques is however, contraindicated under certain situations. (3)

The Cefaly device is meant to be administered on migraine patients and those with joint pains who are 18 years and older and for no longer than 20 minutes a day. The medical device is both CE and ISO certified for safety and performance as well as effectiveness.

It is believed to be 25% more effective than any other migraine management options available through prescription and is also effective in conditions such as insomnia and anxiety.

About 53 percent of 2,313 patients in a separate study said they were satisfied with the device and willing to purchase it for future use. (4)

For details of the study and a word from the doctors and developers, WATCH VIDEO: Migraine Relief Using New FDA-Approved Portable TENS Device ; Liberty Voice; Web March 2014; http://guardianlv.com/2014/03/migraine-relief-using-new-fda-approved-portable-tens-device/

SOURCES

  1. Image Credits: Cefaly Drug-Free Migraine Pain Relief; Cefaly; Web March 2014; http://www.cefaly.ca/
  2. FDA Approves Electric Headband to Prevent Migraine; ABC News; Web March 2014; http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/fda-approves-electric-headband-prevent-migraine-22866209
  3. FDA approves electric headband that prevents migraines; MedCity News; Web March 2014; http://medcitynews.com/2014/03/fda-approves-electric-headband-prevents-migraines/#ixzz2vj7F2HGq
  4. FDA Approves Electric Headband To Prevent Migraine; NPR; Web March 2014; http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=289099411

Copyrights apply on this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.

What Your Skin Temperature Could Tell About Your Migraine

 

Voila

Lower Temperatures At Body Extremities Could Indicate Migraine In Women (1)

A small scale study observing a women-only population of 41 Finnish women stated that skin temperatures in migraining women can be used as a bio-marker of vascular health since migraineurs are more at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than healthy populations.

The study’s report published in Autonomic Neuroscience also observed that those with migraines usually have colder nose as well as hand and feet and that it could be attributed to abnormalities in the underlying blood vessels.

Here’s a quick look at the study statistics: (2)

  • Total women studied: 41
  • Those with migraines: 12; 10 with family history of migraines
  • Those without migraines: 29; 9 with family history of migraines

Out of the 12 migraining women 7 were found to experience right-sides migraines and 5 suffered the brunt of left-sided pains. The migraining population experienced visual aura. The study used digital infrared camera to measure skin temperatures in both migraining and control group. Temperatures of the cheeks, nose, forehead, fingertips and toes were taken for comparisons during headache-free periods.

The following results were obtained:

  • Women with right-sided migraines had higher blood pressure.
  • Women with right-sided migraines had lower hand and finger temperatures.
  • Compared to controls (healthy population) there was a 12 deg C (9 deg F) difference in temperatures at the fingertips and nose (extremities)

This could be explained by the fact that migraineurs often have constricted peripheral arteries or impaired functioning of the autonomic nervous system which in turn also makes them more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases.

The average temperature of the nose and hands was about 16 deg C (approx 3.6 degrees F) lower in migraine subjects than controls. Of the migraine patients, 58% had skin temperatures below 30 deg C (or 86 deg F), which is considered a normal skin temperature, in both the nose and fingers.

However, it must be noted that this study was not only small sized but also did not include men. Larger population studies including men and other ethnic groups should be conducted to come to a definitive conclusion. It however, does provide some indication to the direction in which medication development can be done. Biofeedback as an alternative medical therapy makes use of this skin temperature differential in migraineurs to manage pain episodes.

 SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Business Woman Worried Stock Photo; freedigitalphotos.net; Web January 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Business_People_g201-Business_Woman_Worried_p76375.html
  2. The Connection Between Migraines and Skin Temperature; The Wall Street Journal; Web January 2013; http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303497804579242423379994080

 Copyrights apply to this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.

Sleep Quality Influences Migraine Frequency And Disability

Sleeping Woman - Migraine Blog

 

Sleep Quality Directly Effects How Often You Get Migraines (1)

Tests conducted by researchers at the University of Mississippi, U.S.A have shown a strong correlation between poor quality of sleep and the frequency of migraine episodes as well as the disabilities that go with the condition.

The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was employed in the study which tested 78 migraineurs and 208 non-migraineurs who formed the control group.

The PSQI is a tool in the form of a scoring but subjective questionnaire developed by the Sleep Medicine Institute of the University of Pittsburgh. It has questions within it’s 7 broad components on which a patient is scored, viz;

  • Subjective Sleep Quality,
  • Sleep Latency,
  • Sleep Duration,
  • Habitual Sleep Efficiency,
  • Sleep Disturbance,
  • Use of Sleep Medicines,
  • Daytime Dysfunction.

Todd Smitherman and his team found that sleep quality was significantly worse for those experiencing episodic migraines than for those in the control group. The migraining group scored an average PSQI of 8.90 as compared to 6.63 in the control group. A PSQI score more than 5 is considered significantly bad.

Factors such as depression, anxiety were adjusted for the regression analysis calculations but still it accounted for 5.3% and 5.8% of unique variance in headache frequency and disability, respectively, which the researchers say is a modest but non-trivial amount. Even when depression and anxiety factors after poor sleep quality were included in the calculations the affective symptoms did not significantly improve these analysis models beyond that of sleep quality alone which made sleep quality almost an independent and very relevant factor in assessing headache frequencies and related disabilities.

As per Smitherman, “As such, sleep quality should be assessed preferentially to other sleep disturbance variables when subjective self-report measures of insomnia are used. In light of the present findings, conclusions from systematic reviews, and practice guidelines, the most potent means of improving sleep quality and insomnia among migraineurs is likely a treatment package that incorporates stimulus control and/or sleep restriction in addition to basic sleep hygiene education and management of comorbid psychiatric symptoms.” (2)

SOURCES:

  1. Image Credits: Freedigitalphotos.net; Tired Woman by Graur Codrin; Web August 2013; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10021635
  2. Sleep Quality A Key Contributor To Migraine Severity; MedWireNews.com (Springer Healthcare Limited); Web August 2013; http://www.medwirenews.com/44/104664/General_neurology/Sleep_quality_a_key_contributor_to_migraine_severity_.html
  •  Abstract of the research may be had at:

Sleep Disturbance and Affective Comorbidity Among Episodic Migraineurs; Wiley Online Library; Web August 2013; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/head.12168/abstract

Copyrights apply on this blog. Please refer copyright permissions.