Tackling Migraines Quickly With Beta-Blocker Eye Drops

Eye Drops For Migraines

Eye Drops With Beta Blockers Contain Migraine Pain (1)

In the latest edition of the journal Missouri Medicine, ophthalmologists Carl V. Migliazzo and John C. Hagan have have outlined how administering just 1-2 drops per eye of eye drops containing beta blockers stub migraine pain and in some cases almost cure migraineurs of attacks.

The eye doctors conducted their study on a population that comprised of women only migraineurs who were suffering for many years, even decades with migraine attacks.

Dr. Migliazzo seemed to have struck upon this treatment entirely by coincidence when he had been routinely managing his glaucoma patients with these eye drops. As per him, “People would report to me spontaneously saying: ‘You know, doctor, my headaches started getting better after I started on this medication.’” (2) And since then he has recommended it to his patients who also experience migraines. He does accept that there may be a placebo affect at work for some patients who said it worked for them. To obtain more data on his study, Dr. Migliazzo wants to examine more patients and have a control group as well to check on the eye drops placebo effect.

However, there may be a good scientific rationale behind why eye drops containing beta blockers work for migraine patients. Beta blockers are primary drugs in the current scenario to manage hypertension, certain heart conditions and are also prescribed as prophylaxis for migraines. Besides, they are very cheap and safe with really low side effects. In addition to this, beta blockers reach the blood stream relatively faster and in time to save a migraine attack.

During a study of one beta blocker, a patient told researchers that he not only had fewer chest pains, but fewer migraines as well. His migraines returned only after he was switched to a placebo.

According to Dr. Mittal who is working with Dr. Hagan, “Eye drops containing beta quickly drain into the nose, where they’re rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream through the mucus membrane. If you can get something in their system as soon as possible, you have a better chance” to stop migraine attacks.” (3)

So it sounds like a case that certainly requires further testing and research. Dr. Hagan hopes that someone will pursue this research to be sure if this certainly works or if there is a large placebo effect at work. Earlier studies from the 1980s have shown some migraineurs benefiting from the use of such eye drops but no further testing had been pursued on the matter.

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Putting Drops In Eye Stock Photo by Marin; Freedigitalphotos.net; Web September 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Healthcare_g355-Putting_Drops_In_Eye_p112466.html
  2. Eye drops may hold quick relief for migraine sufferers; Kansas City News; Web September 2012; http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article1379677.html
  3. Eye drops may hold quick relief for migraine sufferers; Life Extension Foundation; web September 2014; http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=22812&Section=Disease

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Danger Of Ischemic Stroke In Older Migraineurs

stroke_isc_web Older Migraineurs Have Higher Chances Of Suffering Silent Brain Injuries – (1)

A new study published in the May 15th issue of American Heart and Stroke Association’s medical journal Stroke, suggests that older migraineurs have an double the risk of suffering from silent brain injuries and ischemic stroke than those who do not experience migraines.

Silent strokes can be asymptomatic i.e they do not show symptoms but increase the risk of future strokes. Silent stroke or a silent brain infarction is caused by a blood clot getting into the brain artery and thus interrupting the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to brain tissue surrounding the clot thus killing it.

As per Teshamae Monteith, M.D., lead author of the study, “I do not believe migraine sufferers should worry, as the risk of ischemic stroke in people with migraine is considered small. However, those with migraine and vascular risk factors may want to pay even greater attention to lifestyle changes that can reduce stroke risk, such as exercising and eating a low-fat diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables.” (2)

He raised caution that if an older migraineurs had other coexisting conditions like a high blood pressure (hypertension) or a sedentary lifestyle, it would add to the risk factor for suffering silent strokes and brain damage. He thus advised them to take medication to address hypertension and to bring it under control.

The study was a research on diverse ethnic groups including people of Hispanic and African origin. It was a collaborative investigation conducted by University of Miami and Columbia University.

Some of the highlights of the study were as follows: (3)

  • Approximate 40% of the population studied comprised of men.
  • The average age of the population was around 71 years old.
  • 65% of the population under study was of Hispanic origin.
  • Of the 546 studied, 104 had a history of migraines.

Some conclusions arrived at were as:

  • Risk of silent brain infarctions in those with migraine double even after adjusting other stroke risk factors.
  • Migraines with aura were not a deciding factor in measuring risk of silent strokes.
  • No real increase in the volume of white matter/ Small blood vessel anamolies was associated with migraines.
  • Some lesions came across in radiographic images as having ischemic origins but more research was required to confirm this.

According to Monteith, “We still don’t know if treatment for migraines will have an impact on stroke risk reduction, but it may be a good idea to seek treatment from a migraine specialist if your headaches are out of control. (4)

Previous studies indicated migraine could be an important stroke risk factor for younger people.

SOURCES:

  1. Image Credit: Ischemic stroke; Heart & Stroke Foundation – Canada; Web May 2014; http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/c.ikIQLcMWJtE/b.3484151/k.7916/Stroke__Ischemic_stroke.htm
  2. Older migraine sufferers may have more silent brain injury; Science Daily News; Web May 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515163826.htm
  3. Abstract of the study can be accessed at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.abstract
  4. Older people with migraines ‘more likely to have silent brain injury’; Medical News Today; Web May 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276842.php

Details of the study published in AHA journal, Stroke: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.full.pdf+html

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Finally A Stroke Guideline For Women!

Brain-Haemorrage

Hemorrhagic Stroke Risk In Women Addressed By AHA/ASA For The First Time (1)

Recent research has shown that migraineurs and especially those who experience aura are at an increased risk of a stroke (brain hemorrhage) or a heart attack during a migraine episode. My post of June 20th, 2013 speaks of this research (on high risk of stroke among the migraining population): http://bit.ly/1iON349

A stroke may be either ischemic or hemorrhagic in nature. A hemorrhagic stroke is the rupturing of an artery in the brain which results in bleeding in the tissues surrounding the rupture and killing the brain cells there which are devoid of blood, oxygen and nutrition. An ischemic stroke occurs when there is an obstruction like cholesterol or clot in the arteries in the brain. These account for almost 90% of all strokes and are less likely to result in fatality if given immediate attention. However, migraineurs are more susceptible to the deadlier hemorrhagic strokes. (2)

[Read WebMD research on how women with migraine with aura may be at increased risk for an additional type of stroke called hemorrhagic stroke here: http://bit.ly/1cmHW6Y ]

Given that women are more susceptible to migraines with aura, the higher risk of getting a stroke is inherent yet there have been no guidelines to date to address stroke issues in women. Finally a guideline has been issued by The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for health professionals to prevent strokes in women. Here are a few of the important recommendation highlights you should know:

1. FOR MIGRAINEURS

“Women are four times more likely to have migraines than men, and they often coincide with hormone swings. Migraines alone don’t raise the risk of stroke, but ones with aura do. Using oral contraceptives and smoking raise this risk even more, so the guidelines urge stopping smoking.” (3)

2. FOR ELDERLY WOMEN

Women over 75 years of age should be screened for atrial fibrillation as it is an increased stroke risk factor.

3. FOR WOMEN WITH HYPERTENSION/ HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Low dose aspirin or calcium supplement therapy is recommended to cut of stroke risk

4. WOMEN WITH PRE-ECLAMPSIA

Preeclampsia is a condition where a pregnant woman experiences both high blood pressure and a significant increase in protein in her urine. Women with preeclampsia are twice as likely to get a stroke and four times as likely to suffer from high blood pressure later in life. In addition, they are to be treated for weight and cholesterol issues as well as smoking.

5. PREGNANT WOMEN:

Such women who are pregnant and suffer from high blood pressure (>=160/110 mmHg) should be given medication for high blood pressure. Those who are expectant are to be treated for readings in the range of 150-159 mmHg/100-109 mmHg. (4)

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Brain Hemorrhage; Sanitarian.net; Web February 2014; http://www.sanitarian.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Brain-Haemorrage.jpg
  2. Study Shows Increased Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke for Migraines With Aura; WebMD.com; Web February 2014; http://www.webmd.com/stroke/news/20100824/migraines-with-aura-may-raise-stroke-risk
  3. Guidelines For Stroke Prevention In Women Issued; Forbes.com; Web February 2014; http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertglatter/2014/02/09/guidelines-for-stroke-prevention-in-women-issued/2/
  4. Stroke prevention in women: guidelines set for the first time; Medical News Today; Web February 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272351.php

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Migraining Women Likely To Develop Dementia: Study

Dementia Risk For Migraineurs

 

Migraineurs With Aura Are 48% More Likely To Develop Dementia In Later Life (1)

As if the sustained pounding, debilitating pain, the flurry of traumatic symptoms and ineffective medicines were not enough for migraineurs, studies are now showing that persons who suffer migraines with visual and other aura are 48% more likely to develop dementia as they begin to age than their healthier counterparts! (2)

In part this could be explained by the presence of white matter lesions that the brains of migraineurs are often seemed to have when scanned using an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging).

We know that white matter of the brain consists of nerve fibres (axons) and are surrounded by fat called myelin (3). The main function of the white matter is to transmit signals from one region of the cerebrum to another and between the cerebrum and lower brain centres. Lesions in the white matter interfere with signal transmissions. Damage to this white matter is a common significant factor observed in all those suffering from dementia.

Earlier control tests and those conducted at the Changhua Christian Hospital, Taiwan has already shown that migraineurs are at an exponential risk of diabetes and of developing hypertension, depression and cardiovascular diseases.

However, other studies have shown that the mental status of women with a history of migraine was no different from other women’s, so more research is needed.

SOURCES

  1. Image Credits: Dementia Disease And A Loss Of Brain Function And Memories As Al by David Castillo Dominici: FreeDigitalPhotos.net; Web November 2013; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/dementia-disease-and-a-loss-of-brain-function-and-memories-as-al-photo-p173821
  2. Migraine may be linked to dementia; IOL Lifestyle; Web November 2013; http://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/migraine-may-be-linked-to-dementia-1.1608597#.UoowF9JmiSo
  3. White matter of the brain; MedlinePlus; Web November 2013; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002344.htm

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