Butterbur Found Effective In Treating Migraines: Studies

butterbur

The Daisy-family Petasites Prove Themselves Effective In Migraine Treatment (1)

Butterbur, Petasites or Sweet Coltsfoot are residents of moist regions like marshes, ditches  and riverbeds and do well in temperate regions in the northern hemisphere. Studies have shown that certain species contain chemicals petasin and isopetasin which occur in high concentrations in the plant’s root and are very effective in treating migraines. 

In my post of April 26th, 2012, titled ‘New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency’ I had outlined how the AAN listed out Butterbur as one of the herbal formulae that they found effective in the management of migraines. (2) 

The organic compound petasin found in butterbur is a combination of the ester of petasol and angelic acid known to stub inflammatory response in the body. It is also a proven muscle relaxant. Moreover, irritable blood vessels that are known to add to the woes of a migraineur are also soothed by petasin and isopetasin by control of blood pressure and spasmodic capillary action. Several German researches have found that incidences of migraines could be reduced by as much as 50% even in long-term patients. (3) 

Here are a list of studies that have expanded on the find: 

  • Evidence-based guideline update: NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society; AHRQ (US Dept Of Health & Human Services); http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?f=rss&id=36897
  •  The First Placebo-Controlled Trial of a Special Butterbur Root Extract for the Prevention of Migraine: Reanalysis of Efficacy Criteria; European Neurology; Diener HC, Rahlfs VW, Danesch U. Eur Neurol. 2004;51(2):89-97. http://www.petasites.eu/PDF/Eur_Neurol.pdf
  •  An extract of Petasites hybridus is effective in the prophylaxis of migraine. NCBI Resources – PubMed; Grossmann M, Schmidramsl H. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2000 Sep;38(9):430-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11020030
  •  Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventive treatment for migraine.NCBI Resources – PubMed; Lipton RB, Gobel H, Einhaupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A. Neurology. 2004 Dec 28;63(12):2240-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15623680

Butterbur is available as a herbal tea though it is hard to palate because of it’s bitter taste. However, capsules of butterbur may be a better option. Doctors usually recommend 50-75 mg twice daily as effective prophylactic dosage.

It is imperative that you consult a doctor before taking any butterbur preparation. 

Once advised, choose a brand that says ‘PA-Free’ indicative of the removal of toxic chemical pyrolizidine alkaloid which is toxic to the liver. (4)  

SOURCES: 

  1. Image Credit: Butterbur 628x 323; Spring Allergy Relief; Prevention.com; Web February 2014; http://bit.ly/1nMkgOH
  2. New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency; Migrainingjenny.wordpress.com; Web February 2014; https://migrainingjenny.wordpress.com/2012/04/26/new-guidelines-from-american-academy-of-neurology-on-reduction-of-migraine-frequency/
  3. Butterbur: For Migraines, Allergies, And More; Chiroeco.com; Web February 2014; http://www.chiroeco.com/chiropractic/news/14902/856/butterbur-%20for%20migraines-%20allergies-%20and%20more/
  4. Butterbur In The Treatment Of Migraines; WholesomeOne.com; Web February 2014; http://www.wholesomeone.com/article/butterbur-treatment-migraines

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New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency

New guidelines or strategy if you will, have been chalked out and released by scientists at the American Academy of Neurology in conjunction with the American Headache Society on the approach migraineurs should take to reduce the frequency of their attacks. These guidelines have been released just this week and basically are a little different from the previous guidelines in terms that they reduce the ranking of certain migraine drugs (such as Verapamil and Gabapentin) which were highly recommended in the last guidelines due to evidence gathered against them. In addition, the new guidelines are based on evidence-based research on a larger population than were done for the last set of guidelines covering various demographics – gender, races etc. (1)

Want Fewer Migraine Attacks? Follow a Preventative Regimen Everyday (2)

As per the neurologists, almost 38% of all migraineurs should follow a preventative strategy to reduce the number of their migraine episodes. But only a third of that percentage followed a daily preventative regimen with the rest of them only resorting to band aid approaches and tackling the pain once they are in the throes of a migraine attack or are expecting one within a few hours. The approaches they often took were such as were not proven effective in scientific testing before.

According to Mark Green, MD, director of the Headache Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in New York, “What the guidelines do is pinpoint first-line treatments based on evidence and effectiveness.  If these guidelines are used widely, we will be able to up the odds of reducing headaches by 50 percent. Moreover, the stakes may be high if we undertreat migraines. Evidence is building to suggest that if we allow migraines to progress, the frequency of attacks may increase, and they may also become harder to treat” (3)

Here’s a quick look at what the evidence-based preventative guidelines suggests to migraineurs:

  1. First line prescription drugs must be taken on a daily basis to bring down the number and intensity of the attacks.
  2. Effective For Prevention: Anti-seizure medications Divalproex sodium, Sodium valproate, Topiramate, Metoprolol, Propranol, Tumolol.
  3. Effective Herbal Preparations: Butterbur / Petasites.
  4. Probably Effective: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDS such as Fenoprofen, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, Naproxen, Naproxen Sodium, Subcutaneous histamine, Complementary treatments, Magnesium, Riboflavin, Feverfew.
  5. Found Not Effective: Anti-seizure drug lamotrigine was not effective in preventing migraine.

SOURCES:

  1. New Guidelines Assert That Daily Preventive Therapies Significantly Reduce Migraines; Newswise; April 2012; http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/588495/?sc=rsmn&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NewswiseMednews+%28Newswise%3A+MedNews%29
  2. Image by Ambro; Freedigitalphotos.net; April 2012; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/view_photog.php?photogid=1499
  3. New Guidelines: Treatments Can Help Prevent Migraine; American Academy of Neurology (AAN); April 2012; http://www.aan.com/press/index.cfm?fuseaction=release.view&release=1062

Video of the 2012 AAN Conference may be accessed at:

  1. 2012 AAN Press Conference: New Guidelines on Preventing Migraine Headache; YouTube.com; April 2012; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoKPwq9JcKE&feature=g-upl&context=G2423319AUAAAAAAAAAA

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