Danger Of Ischemic Stroke In Older Migraineurs

stroke_isc_web Older Migraineurs Have Higher Chances Of Suffering Silent Brain Injuries – (1)

A new study published in the May 15th issue of American Heart and Stroke Association’s medical journal Stroke, suggests that older migraineurs have an double the risk of suffering from silent brain injuries and ischemic stroke than those who do not experience migraines.

Silent strokes can be asymptomatic i.e they do not show symptoms but increase the risk of future strokes. Silent stroke or a silent brain infarction is caused by a blood clot getting into the brain artery and thus interrupting the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to brain tissue surrounding the clot thus killing it.

As per Teshamae Monteith, M.D., lead author of the study, “I do not believe migraine sufferers should worry, as the risk of ischemic stroke in people with migraine is considered small. However, those with migraine and vascular risk factors may want to pay even greater attention to lifestyle changes that can reduce stroke risk, such as exercising and eating a low-fat diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables.” (2)

He raised caution that if an older migraineurs had other coexisting conditions like a high blood pressure (hypertension) or a sedentary lifestyle, it would add to the risk factor for suffering silent strokes and brain damage. He thus advised them to take medication to address hypertension and to bring it under control.

The study was a research on diverse ethnic groups including people of Hispanic and African origin. It was a collaborative investigation conducted by University of Miami and Columbia University.

Some of the highlights of the study were as follows: (3)

  • Approximate 40% of the population studied comprised of men.
  • The average age of the population was around 71 years old.
  • 65% of the population under study was of Hispanic origin.
  • Of the 546 studied, 104 had a history of migraines.

Some conclusions arrived at were as:

  • Risk of silent brain infarctions in those with migraine double even after adjusting other stroke risk factors.
  • Migraines with aura were not a deciding factor in measuring risk of silent strokes.
  • No real increase in the volume of white matter/ Small blood vessel anamolies was associated with migraines.
  • Some lesions came across in radiographic images as having ischemic origins but more research was required to confirm this.

According to Monteith, “We still don’t know if treatment for migraines will have an impact on stroke risk reduction, but it may be a good idea to seek treatment from a migraine specialist if your headaches are out of control. (4)

Previous studies indicated migraine could be an important stroke risk factor for younger people.

SOURCES:

  1. Image Credit: Ischemic stroke; Heart & Stroke Foundation – Canada; Web May 2014; http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/c.ikIQLcMWJtE/b.3484151/k.7916/Stroke__Ischemic_stroke.htm
  2. Older migraine sufferers may have more silent brain injury; Science Daily News; Web May 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515163826.htm
  3. Abstract of the study can be accessed at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.abstract
  4. Older people with migraines ‘more likely to have silent brain injury’; Medical News Today; Web May 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276842.php

Details of the study published in AHA journal, Stroke: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.full.pdf+html

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Brain Volume In Older Groups With Migraine & Depression

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Brain Tissue Volume Shrinkage in Older Group With Migraine And Depression (1)

Current studies conducted at the National Institute on Aging and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, in Bethesda, Md show that older population who suffer from migraines and depression have smaller brain size in terms of brain volume compared to those in the same age group who have either one or neither of these conditions.

The study which was published in Neurology® examined 4296 persons around the approximate age of 51 years of age, over a 24 year period. This population was reassessed for another four years after a gap of 11 years by which time their average age was 74 years old.

On assessment it was found that for the migraineurs and the depressed there was an average 19.2 millilitres smaller in terms of total brain tissue volume when compared to those who had only one of these conditions or none of them.

As per the lead author of the study, Larus S. Gudmundsson, PhD, “It is important to note that participants in this study were imaged using MRI once, so we cannot say that migraine and depression resulted in brain atrophy. In future studies, we need to examine at what age participants develop both migraine and depression and measure their brain volume changes over time in order to determine what comes first.”

SOURCES:

  1. Image by ddpavumba; FreeDigitalPhotos.net; Web May 2013; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Human_body_g281-Human_Brain_p110570.html
  2. Migraine and Depression Together May Be Linked With Brain Size; Science Daily News; Web May 2013; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130522163919.htm

Copyrights apply on the blog. Please refer copyright permissions.