Danger Of Ischemic Stroke In Older Migraineurs

stroke_isc_web Older Migraineurs Have Higher Chances Of Suffering Silent Brain Injuries – (1)

A new study published in the May 15th issue of American Heart and Stroke Association’s medical journal Stroke, suggests that older migraineurs have an double the risk of suffering from silent brain injuries and ischemic stroke than those who do not experience migraines.

Silent strokes can be asymptomatic i.e they do not show symptoms but increase the risk of future strokes. Silent stroke or a silent brain infarction is caused by a blood clot getting into the brain artery and thus interrupting the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to brain tissue surrounding the clot thus killing it.

As per Teshamae Monteith, M.D., lead author of the study, “I do not believe migraine sufferers should worry, as the risk of ischemic stroke in people with migraine is considered small. However, those with migraine and vascular risk factors may want to pay even greater attention to lifestyle changes that can reduce stroke risk, such as exercising and eating a low-fat diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables.” (2)

He raised caution that if an older migraineurs had other coexisting conditions like a high blood pressure (hypertension) or a sedentary lifestyle, it would add to the risk factor for suffering silent strokes and brain damage. He thus advised them to take medication to address hypertension and to bring it under control.

The study was a research on diverse ethnic groups including people of Hispanic and African origin. It was a collaborative investigation conducted by University of Miami and Columbia University.

Some of the highlights of the study were as follows: (3)

  • Approximate 40% of the population studied comprised of men.
  • The average age of the population was around 71 years old.
  • 65% of the population under study was of Hispanic origin.
  • Of the 546 studied, 104 had a history of migraines.

Some conclusions arrived at were as:

  • Risk of silent brain infarctions in those with migraine double even after adjusting other stroke risk factors.
  • Migraines with aura were not a deciding factor in measuring risk of silent strokes.
  • No real increase in the volume of white matter/ Small blood vessel anamolies was associated with migraines.
  • Some lesions came across in radiographic images as having ischemic origins but more research was required to confirm this.

According to Monteith, “We still don’t know if treatment for migraines will have an impact on stroke risk reduction, but it may be a good idea to seek treatment from a migraine specialist if your headaches are out of control. (4)

Previous studies indicated migraine could be an important stroke risk factor for younger people.

SOURCES:

  1. Image Credit: Ischemic stroke; Heart & Stroke Foundation – Canada; Web May 2014; http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/c.ikIQLcMWJtE/b.3484151/k.7916/Stroke__Ischemic_stroke.htm
  2. Older migraine sufferers may have more silent brain injury; Science Daily News; Web May 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515163826.htm
  3. Abstract of the study can be accessed at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.abstract
  4. Older people with migraines ‘more likely to have silent brain injury’; Medical News Today; Web May 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276842.php

Details of the study published in AHA journal, Stroke: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/05/15/STROKEAHA.114.005447.full.pdf+html

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Butterbur Found Effective In Treating Migraines: Studies

butterbur

The Daisy-family Petasites Prove Themselves Effective In Migraine Treatment (1)

Butterbur, Petasites or Sweet Coltsfoot are residents of moist regions like marshes, ditches  and riverbeds and do well in temperate regions in the northern hemisphere. Studies have shown that certain species contain chemicals petasin and isopetasin which occur in high concentrations in the plant’s root and are very effective in treating migraines. 

In my post of April 26th, 2012, titled ‘New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency’ I had outlined how the AAN listed out Butterbur as one of the herbal formulae that they found effective in the management of migraines. (2) 

The organic compound petasin found in butterbur is a combination of the ester of petasol and angelic acid known to stub inflammatory response in the body. It is also a proven muscle relaxant. Moreover, irritable blood vessels that are known to add to the woes of a migraineur are also soothed by petasin and isopetasin by control of blood pressure and spasmodic capillary action. Several German researches have found that incidences of migraines could be reduced by as much as 50% even in long-term patients. (3) 

Here are a list of studies that have expanded on the find: 

  • Evidence-based guideline update: NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society; AHRQ (US Dept Of Health & Human Services); http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?f=rss&id=36897
  •  The First Placebo-Controlled Trial of a Special Butterbur Root Extract for the Prevention of Migraine: Reanalysis of Efficacy Criteria; European Neurology; Diener HC, Rahlfs VW, Danesch U. Eur Neurol. 2004;51(2):89-97. http://www.petasites.eu/PDF/Eur_Neurol.pdf
  •  An extract of Petasites hybridus is effective in the prophylaxis of migraine. NCBI Resources – PubMed; Grossmann M, Schmidramsl H. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2000 Sep;38(9):430-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11020030
  •  Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventive treatment for migraine.NCBI Resources – PubMed; Lipton RB, Gobel H, Einhaupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A. Neurology. 2004 Dec 28;63(12):2240-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15623680

Butterbur is available as a herbal tea though it is hard to palate because of it’s bitter taste. However, capsules of butterbur may be a better option. Doctors usually recommend 50-75 mg twice daily as effective prophylactic dosage.

It is imperative that you consult a doctor before taking any butterbur preparation. 

Once advised, choose a brand that says ‘PA-Free’ indicative of the removal of toxic chemical pyrolizidine alkaloid which is toxic to the liver. (4)  

SOURCES: 

  1. Image Credit: Butterbur 628x 323; Spring Allergy Relief; Prevention.com; Web February 2014; http://bit.ly/1nMkgOH
  2. New Guidelines from American Academy of Neurology On Reduction of Migraine Frequency; Migrainingjenny.wordpress.com; Web February 2014; https://migrainingjenny.wordpress.com/2012/04/26/new-guidelines-from-american-academy-of-neurology-on-reduction-of-migraine-frequency/
  3. Butterbur: For Migraines, Allergies, And More; Chiroeco.com; Web February 2014; http://www.chiroeco.com/chiropractic/news/14902/856/butterbur-%20for%20migraines-%20allergies-%20and%20more/
  4. Butterbur In The Treatment Of Migraines; WholesomeOne.com; Web February 2014; http://www.wholesomeone.com/article/butterbur-treatment-migraines

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