Massage For Your Migraines?

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For Some Migraineurs, Special Head and Neck Massages Help (1)

For all the research being done with electrical stimulation of nerves, surgeries to potent medications and herbs, for some migraineurs the answer to their misery could come from the unassuming massage. But this by no means is a regular spa massage. Conducted by migraine specialists the massage targets certain places and obstructions to relieve pain and reduce attack incidences. In other words, the migraineurs neither puts up with the horrible side-effects of hand-me-down drugs originally aimed at treating other conditions, nor does she have to go on impractical diets.

A Bay Area physical therapist, Sheldon Low has discovered a massage method that is not currently popular as a migraine treatment and management technique among other doctors. He has worked on some chronic migraineurs and those who experienced the migraine trauma since their teens with amazing results.

A therapist for 35 years, Low worked on patient Zoe Soane who had been migraining since she was only 13 and lived life less than optimally because of the recurrent attacks that left her exhausted with pain and dizziness and rattled. Simple things like motion, computer screen glare, sunshine or strong winds worked as triggers for her. Though Soane was referred to for neck issue but Dr. Low found her a massage technique that worked for her!

As per Dr. Low, “It’s my theory, and my experience that taking pressure off the scalp nerves, that’s taking away the impingement and causative agent of the headaches. I’m actually working into that scar tissue trying to break it down. It’s almost like controlled shearing. If you’re peeling an orange and trying to play that game to keep the orange peel together and you’re trying to work it around so you’re not breaking the peel apart.” (2)

The therapist says he look for lumps or bumps in the head and neck areas. If he finds them sensitive then he knows what he has to work on. He goes by common sense and knowledge that any lumps in that area are not normal and neither skull nor any other bone. Some times these lumps have formed as a part of body’s inflammatory response to a fall or injury that happened in childhood which has hardened over a period of time causing trouble and blockages now.

Soane’s migraine episodes have diminished in number and in intensity. This treatment could be transferred to other migraineurs as well or so believes Dr. Marc Lenaerts, a fellow of the American Headache Society who also runs the headache clinic at UC Davis Medical Center, “Freeing inflammatory fluids, and humors and freeing the adhesions between the tissues is a very important point and worthwhile looking into. Probably not enough people practicing and doing it on a regular basis. Conclusion is we need more scientific evidence, but it’s encouraging and worthwhile going further.” (2)

SOURCES

  1. Image credit: Massage, flower, spa, gels – Photostock; freedigitalphotos.net; Web February 2015; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Healthy_Living_g284-Massageflowerspa_Gels_p37679.html
  2. Migraine Cure Could Be A Massage Away; CBS Sacramento; Web February 2015; http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2015/02/04/migraine-cure-could-be-a-massage-away/

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Migraines Peg Risk Of Facial Palsy Significantly

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Migraineurs at Double The Risk Of Developing Facial Paralysis (1)

As per a recent study conducted by a team of scientists working with Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan and National Yang-Ming University, migraineurs are at almost double the risk than non-migraineurs to develop facial paralysis also known as Bell’s Palsy.

The report of the study was published in the 13th January, 2015 issue of the medical journal Neurology of the American Association of Neurologists. Bell’s Palsy occurs due to the dysfunction of a specific cranial nerve that controls facial muscle movements. Some characteristics involve not being able to blink with the eye on the side the facial nerve is affected. Other signs include development of a facial droop on the affected side. Other things such as smiling, frowning, tear-formation, salivation, flaring nostrils and raising eyebrows may all be affected in Bell’s Palsy.

As per lead researcher and author of the study, Shuu-Jiun Wang, MD, “This is a very new association between migraine and Bell’s palsy. Our study also suggests that these two conditions may share a common underlying link.” (2)

It is assumed that anything between 11 to 40 people in every 100,000 people get Bell’s Palsy due to recurring migraines. In the study two groups of adult population were selected. The total persons under study were 136,704. One group had the migraineurs and the other had the non-migraineurs. The observations of the study continued for a period of 3 years. During that time, 671 people in the migraine group and 365 of the non-migraine group were newly diagnosed with Bell’s palsy. People with migraine were twice as likely to develop Bell’s palsy even after researchers accounted for other factors and medical conditions. (3)

According to Dr. Wang, “Infection, inflammation or heart and vascular problems could be shared causes for these diseases. If a common link is identified and confirmed, more research may lead to better treatments for both conditions.”

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Woman Face With Natural Look by Phasinphoto; freedigitalphotos.net; Web January 2015; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/woman-face-with-natural-look-photo-p247674
  2. Migraine May Double Risk Of Facial Paralysis; ScienceDaily.com; Web December 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141217171315.htm
  3. Does Migraine Produce Facial Palsy? Neurology; Web January 2015; http://www.neurology.org/content/84/2/108.short

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Defective Nerve Insulation In Migraineurs: Study

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Myelin Sheath & Cellular Elements Over Axons of Nerve Cells Are Patchy Or Missing In Migraineurs (1)

A study conducted by a team of researchers from three different departments at Case Western School of Medicine, clearly exhibits that certain changes at the cellular-level of the nerve structure of migraineurs leads to migraines in many patients. This in turn brings about functional changes of the nerves and further contributes to painful migraine episodes.

The findings of the study were published in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. You can read the report by clicking on the link below (2)

Myelin is an electricity insulating material that forms a layer/sheath which surrounds the axon of a nerve cell/neuron. The detailed study of miniscule specimens of the trigeminal nerves of migraineurs showed that there were abnormalities in the myelin sheath that served as insulation around nerve fibres in the trigeminal nerves.

Another group of patients that had been evaluated and found eligible and thus had opted for plastic surgery as a route to treat their migraine was also studied. They had all undergone the forehead lift procedure, which involved removal of some muscle and vessel tissue surrounding the cranial nerves.

The nerve fiber samples of all these patients were studied and compared for proteomic analysis. Electron microscopy techniques were used for the process of evaluating the presence and functioning of different proteins in the nerve fiber obtained from the patient’s trigeminal nerves. It was found that migraining patients without the surgery had missing or defective myelin sheaths over their nerve cells compared to those that had opted for the surgery.

As per surgeon Bahman Guyuron, MD, of Case Western Reserve University, “If the insulation becomes cracked or damaged by conditions in the environment, that’s going to affect the cable’s ability to perform its normal function. In a similar way, damage to the myelin sheath may make the nerves more prone to irritation by the dynamic structure surrounding them, such as muscle and blood vessels, potentially triggering migraine attacks.” (3)

Another key observation made was that the placement and organization of cellular elements in the nerve fibers was tight and uniform for the group that undergone surgery to treat migraines whereas the migraining group was found to have a discontinuous and patchy distribution of the cellular elements in their nerve fibers.

This brings to light the criticality of the peripheral nerves in triggering complex events in a migraine attack that eventually involves our central nervous system. Co-authors of this study add, “These findings may also lead to other opportunities to treat patients with migraine headaches non-invasively, or with less invasive procedures that repair the defective myelin around nerves, lending additional protection for the nerves.”

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Neurons by Dreams Design; Freedigitialphotos.net; Web November 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Human_body_g281-Neuron_p122308.html
  2. Excerpt of the study may be read at: Electron Microscopic and Proteomic Comparison of Terminal Branches of the Trigeminal Nerve in Patients with and without Migraine Headaches; Journal of The American Society of Plastic Surgeons; Web November 2014; http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2014&issue=11000&article=00036&type=abstract
  3. Migraine Linked To Defective ‘Insulation’ Around Nerve Fibers, Suggests Study; Sciencedaily.com; Web November 2014; http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141103113557.htm

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Happy Deepawali 2014!!

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Wishing All Our Readers A Very Happy, Auspicious, Festive & Prosperous Deepawali!

May You Be Rich Of Friends and Family, Good Health, Ample Time and Life’s Joys:)

Image Credit: Red Candles by think4photop; freedigitalphotos.net; Web October 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Lighting_g192-Red_Candles_p54566.html

Middle Age Migraineurs At Risk Of Parkinson’s Later

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Studies Show Some Middle-Age Migraineurs Go On To Develop Parkinson’s At Old Age (1)

A recent study conducted at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, and published in the medical journal Neurology (of the American Academy of Neurology) , showed that there was a link between migraines and the development of Parkinson’s Disease.

Though severe migraine attacks are considered as disabling as serious illnesses such as dementia, active psychosis or even quadriplegia, it is still the most under-funded and less researched of all neurological diseases in the world.

As per lead author of the study, Ann I. Scher, M.D migraines are the most common brain disorder among both the sexes linked to both cerebrovascular and heart disease. However, the study exhibited that the link between middle-age migraining and Parkinson’s is stronger for women who suffer migraines with aura. She says, “This new possible association is one more reason research is needed to understand, prevent and treat the condition.” (2)

The research involved 5620 persons from Iceland for a period of 25 years. Their ages were between 33 and 65 years at the time when the study began. Of the 5620 persons studied, 1028 had headaches without migraine symptoms, 238 had migraines without aura and 430 experienced migraines with aura. Here are the result highlights:  (3)

  • Migraineurs with aura twice as likely to develop Parkinson’s later than Migraineurs without aura
  • 1% of the persons without headaches developed Parkinson’s later when compared to 2.4% who developed it and had migraines with aura.
  • People with migraine with aura were also around 3.6 times more likely to report at least four of the six symptoms of Parkinson’s, and people with migraine without aura were 2.3 times more likely.
  • Overall rates in absolute terms were as:
        • In people with migraine with aura: 19.7%
        • In people with migraine without aura: 12.6%
        • In people with no headaches at all: 7.5%.

According to Scher, “A dysfunction in the brain messenger dopamine is common to both Parkinson’s and Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS), and has been hypothesized as a possible cause of migraine for many years. Symptoms of migraine such as excessive yawning, nausea and vomiting are thought to be related to dopamine receptor stimulation.  More research should focus on exploring this possible link through genetic studies”

SOURCES

  1. Image Credit: Frustrated Caucasian Woman by Stock Images; Freedigitalphotos.net; Web October 2014; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Emotions_g96-Frustrated_Caucasian_Woman_p81435.html
  2. Link Found Between Migraine And Parkinson’s; Medical News Today; Web October 2014; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282678.php
  3. Migraines In Middle Age, Parkinson’s Risk Later? WebMD.com; Web October 2014; http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/news/20140917/are-migraines-in-middle-age-tied-to-raised-parkinsons-risk-later

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