New Research From AAN: Your Pain Threshold Directly Links To Cortical Thickness

Brain Cortical Thickess

Brain Cortical Thickness Directly Implicated In Feeling Migraine Pain (1)

A new study presented by Mayo Clinic at the AAN’s (American Academy of Neurology) 67th Annual Meeting was highlighted by the Vice Chair of the Academy. The study clearly demonstrated that there was a direct and positive correlation between the cortical thickness in the brain and the thresholds of pain in migraineurs.

As per the Vice Chair of the AAN, Dr. Rost, who is also the director of acute stroke services at the Massachusetts General Hospital and an associate professor at the Harvard Medical School, “The object of study was to evaluate the cortical thickness in the areas that are potentially associated with pain processing.” (2)

Incidentally, other independent studies conducted previously have also indicated that migraineurs are hypersensitive to perceiving their pain partially because they are over-vigilant to certain painful stimuli and are usually not able to distract themselves from the pain or pain stimuli successfully.

The study examined a total of 63 subjects out of which 31 were migraineurs and the remaining were healthy individuals and formed the control group. Using the T1 sequencing technique in MRIs they studied the cortical thickness of each region of their brains and calculated the relation to the person’s pain threshold.

The values arrived at showed a negative correlation in cortical thickness and pain threshold among non-migraineurs. However, the control group had lower cortical thickness in the area of their interest. On the contrary, migraineurs not only had a positive correlation but had less tolerance to specific pain stimuli. The most significant difference in the cortical thickness between the migraineurs and the control group was found to be in the left superior temporal, anterior parietal regions of the brain. Thus this finding, along with some previous studies form a new approach where the doctors should not only use the old techniques to manage migraines but also apply new one where migraineurs are able to inhibit their pain to a significant extent by distracting themselves from it.

According to Dr. Rost, “This is in face the region of the brain that participates in attention to painful stimulus and orientation to that stimulus. It opens an interesting segue into the dynamic interaction of neurons during a migraine. There is a way to retrain the brain and that plasticity, biofeedback and other therapies, play a role in that.”

SOURCE

  1. Human Brain by Dream Designs via Stock Photo; Freedigitalphotos.net; Web May 2015; http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/human-brain-photo-p214120
  2. A New Way To Think About Migraines: Biosciencetechnlogy.com; Web May 2015; http://www.biosciencetechnology.com/articles/2015/05/new-way-think-about-migraines
  3. Correlations between Brain Cortical Thickness and Cutaneous Pain Thresholds Are Atypical in Adults with Migraine; PLOSOne.com; Web May 2015; http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0099791

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